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DESIGN APPROACH




WHO WE ARE
DESIGN APPROACH
SUSTAINABLE DESIGN
DAYLIGHTING


 National Gallery of Canada   National Gallery of Canada

 CAFA MoCA   CAFA MoCA
   Fu Xing Photo


 Clark Art Institute - Stone Hill Center   Clark Art Institute - Stone Hill Center
   Richard Pare

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Daylight Design

FMS seeks to create a seamless integration of natural and electric light to enrich the experience of a space while maximizing the harvesting of daylight. We explore both passive and active systems to realize daylighting solutions that optimize each project. Through the use of daylight sensors, active controls, mirrors, light guides and glazing systems, combined with the newest technologies in electric lighting, we develop project specific solutions that are both energy efficient and support the architectural aesthetic. Included in this process is our constant research of the latest state-of-the-art light sources and ballast technologies so that we can enhance energy savings with efficient and intelligent electric lighting.

Our daylighting services include, but are not limited to:

  • Conducting daylight model testing to determine accurate daylight factors and daylight distribution areas.
  • Assisting in the determination of net visible light transmission specification for the glazing.
  • Assisting in the development of daylight control system specifications and integration of these controls.
  • Preparing daylight calculations to assist in the achievement of BD&C LEED V3 credit IEQ 8.1.

Daylighting Studies

We perform a variety of daylighting studies according to the requirements of each project. The sketch on the left depicts the calculation results for a skylight and laylight concept for the Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Art. The more colorful graphic is a calculation of the sunlight illumination levels at the gallery perimeter at Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco, California. Understanding the dynamic caprices of daylight, both quantitatively and qualitatively, allows us to effectively integrate appropriate levels of electric illumination with available daylight, ultimately reducing energy needs while enhancing the architecture.